FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

TATTOOS

Is tattooing safe?


If you have chosen a professional tattoo studio and proper sterilization and infection control standards are practiced than tattooing is safe. This means anything that comes in contact with blood or other body fluids is medically disposed of (i.e. single use needles) or is sterilized using an autoclave. An autoclave is a device that sterilizes equipment using heat, steam, and pressure. An autoclave maintains a temperature of 250 degrees Fahrenheit under 10 pounds of pressure for 30 minutes or 270 degrees Fahrenheit under 15 pounds of pressure for 15 minutes. This is the only accepted method of sterilization to kill every living microorganism. Single needle use means one customer, one needle. The needles that are used on you are brand new, have been individually packaged, sealed, and autoclaved. After these needles are opened and used, they are disposed of in a safe medically appropriate manner. All pigments, ink cups, ointments, gloves, razors, paper towels (used and unused), surface coverings, and any other materials used during your tattoo process is disposed of immediately. Nothing is reused. Upon the disposal of these items all work surfaces are disinfected with an EPA approved veridical that kills any surface bacteria or viruses. All of this eliminates the possibility of contamination of materials. A professional tattoo studio must be licensed which includes health department inspections. In addition, all professional tattoo artists must be licensed which includes passing a bloodborne pathogens exam. The studio and artists’ licenses should be visible. If you don’t see them, ask for them. Professionals take pride in their skills and work environment.




Where can I find out more information about tattoo aftercare?


You can find more information and detailed instructions about taking care of your new tattoo on our Aftercare page.




Who can I contact if I have questions or problems with my tattoo?


If you have any questions or problems, call us immediately at 305-534.7984. If it is after hours and you have a medical concern, please contact your doctor. If you are having a medical emergency, call 911.




Does getting a tattoo hurt?


While some tattooing may simply give an irritating sensation, others can leave you wanting to run for the hills. Everyone handles pain differently. Some people are more tolerant of pain, others are more sensitive. Your overall physical, mental, and emotional health also play into the level of pain you feel. For instance some people need to mentally focus themselves or even meditate through the process, while others enjoy the distraction of a conversation or reading a book. One thing is for sure, the use of alcohol or drugs prior to getting tattooed do not help suppress the pain, they just intensify it. Eating prior to getting a tattoo is also advisable. The placement of your tattoo is also a factor. Some areas of the body are more sensitive than others. For instance, people who have been tattooed will tell you that the most painful areas are the armpits, groan, both sides of the elbows and knees, hands, feet, head, neck, ribs and chest. From there the amount of intense pain decreases.




What part of my body can I have tattooed?


Where to place a tattoo on your body is a personal decision. A professional tattoo artist will advice you if they think your chosen design would be better placed somewhere else on your body. You should consider what kind of clothes you wear to work and for social engagements, whether or not you want your tattoo to show all the time, and the appropriateness of the design in public. Most professional tattoo studios will not tattoo faces. If a person is already heavily covered in tattoos they may consider tattooing their neck and hands. Generally a professional tattoo studio will not tattoo a client’s neck, hands, or knuckles otherwise. Speaking of hands, fingers, toes, and feet, the skin in these areas is tougher making them more difficult to tattoo. In addition, tattoos in these areas are more likely to fade. Not all scars can be tattooed over. Wait at least 6 months before getting a scar tattooed over. When considering having scars tattooed consult with a professional tattoo artist.




Are tattoos art?


Yes, but not all artists are tattoo artists. A professional tattoo artist has spent years studying and developing their talent and skill level with a seasoned mentor to take their designs from paper to skin. Tattooing is not an art form you can learn in school, it is something a professional tattoo artist lives and breathes with practice and patience over years of study. Talent gets an artistic design on paper; skill takes that artistic design and ensures it is a quality tattoo on the body.




How do I decide on which tattoo artist to collabarate with?


There are a multitude of factors in deciding on a tattoo artist: Ensure the tattoo artist you are considering is licensed and practices proper sterilization and infection control standards. (see above, Is tattooing safe? for further explanation) Seeing a particular artist’s work on another client is the best way to judge if your collaboration will be a good fit. The second best way is to look through a tattoo artist’s portfolio. Most will have a book of photographs they keep with them at all times, however in this day and age you can also find these photos online through a studio or tattoo artist’s website or social media accounts. Taking the time to meet with a tattoo artist and discuss what you are interested in is also important. Asking questions like what style of tattooing the tattoo artist specializes in is key to getting what you want. Listening to your tattoo artist is even more important. For example, a true professional will let you know if a colleague is better suited to do a particular tattoo design, if your placement choice may not give you the affect you wanted, or if the size you have chosen isn’t the best choice or it is beyond their ability. Never decide on a tattoo artist based on price. The old adage, “You get what you pay for.” rings even truer when it comes to tattoos. This is something you will have on your body for the rest of your life; unless of course you’re unhappy with it and spend even more money, time, and pain to have the tattoo removed. Serious tattoo collectors will save their money to get the tattoo they want from a professional tattoo artist with the qualifications required to ensure their clients are happy with their new tattoo. Remember, “Good work ain’t cheap. Cheap work ain’t good.”




How does tattoo application work?


Let’s get scientific. Tattooing is really all about physics. The needles used in tattooing aren’t “injecting” ink into your skin; they are however carrying ink and puncturing your skin. Pigment particles get trapped in the dermis layer of your skin leaving behind your new tattoo.




What are some different tattoo styles?


Black and Grey / Blackwork Black and grey tattoos are done using a degree of black to grey shading. Traditionally, these tattoos do not include any other color, however, occasionally you will see some color added, or in the case of Trash Polka, red. Ken Cameron's South Beach Tattoo Company Blackwork tattoos use only black ink with absolutely no other color and no shading. The designs range from tribal tattoos to custom illustrations or sketches. Color Color tattoos are full color designs lined with black and shaded. These designs can be traditional in style meaning they use block coloring and no tones. Or they can use color shading where colors merge. Japanese Irezumi or traditional Japanese style tattooing took root in the early 17th century. Colorful tattoos filled with folklore heroes and creatures sit on a backdrop of waves, smoke, and clouds making for masterful bodysuits or individual tattoos. Traditional Originating in the 18th Century, traditional tattooing encompasses bold lines and bright blocked colors. Neo-traditional Neo-traditional tattooing is an evolution of traditional tattooing. It holds on to the important element of pronounced linework and vibrant colors yet allows for the blending and merging of those colors. New School Taking after the cartoons and comics of the day, new school tattooing emerged in the latter part of the 20th century. This cartoonish and comic style remains true to the importance of linework and bold colors. Realistic Realistic tattoos are all about the details. From portraits of people to photographs of animals or architecture, these tattoos are meant to look life-like. Portrait Portrait tattoos are normally taken directly from photos. A professional tattoo artist will take a clients photo and make a stencil to apply on the body to use as a guide. The photograph you use should be of good quality and large enough for your tattoo artist to clearly see details. Flash Designs Tattoo flash is a pre-existing design that can be easily copied onto stencil paper that is then placed on your body and finally completed by your professional tattoo artist. Tattoo studios are filled with flash sheets, some dating back to the early 20th century and others more modern. You will find flash created by legendary tattoo artists like Lyle Tutle, Paul Rogers, Ed Hardy, Sailor Jerry, Philadelphia Eddie, Mike Malone, and our own Ken Cameron and Troy Lane in tattoo studios around the world. Custom Design When a professional tattoo artist designs something specifically for you, it is custom. The tattoo artist while collaborating with you on ideas, placement, and size creates this design making it unique. The design can then be placed using stencil paper or the artist may freehand draw all or parts of the design directly on your body. Freehand Freehand tattooing means the tattoo artist draws the design directly on the client without the use of a stencil or prepared drawing. These tattoos provide the client with a truly custom design while taking advantage of individual body shape and allowing the design to have even more free flowing movement. You will notice your tattoo artist using different colored pens/markers to create the design, as each will give way to outlines, shading, and color in the finished tattoo. Tribal There are a variety of styles that fall under the umbrella of tribal tattoos. From Polynesian including Samoan, Hawaiian, Pacific-Northwest, and Maori designs, Iban and Celtic, to Mendi, Mandalas, and Modern. Each is unique and comes with a rich history behind the designs. Cover-ups, Touch-ups, and Reworks Don’t worry, a professional tattoo artist has seen their fair share of unwanted or faded tattoos and will guide you on your options if you choose not to have it removed. Cover-ups can be tricky, but after taking into consideration the size and color of the existing tattoo, a professional tattoo artist will give you options. Granted you may not be thrilled at their initial suggestions due to design or size, it is a start and you and your tattoo artist can come up with a solution you will be happy with in the end. Sometimes an older color tattoo will fade over time due to sun exposure. A professional tattoo artist will be happy to work with you in giving that faded tattoo new life with a pop of color. Occasionally a tattoo that didn’t come out exactly they way you wanted can be reworked by a professional tattoo artist. Reworking entails the tattoo artist going over the existing design and providing more detailed work. Lettering Names, slogans, quotes, mottoes, typeset or freehand, color, black and grey, or black work, lettering tattoos are unique to each collector.





PIERCINGS

Is body piercing safe?


If you have chosen a professional body piercing studio and proper sterilization and infection control standards are practiced than body piercing is safe. This means anything that comes in contact with blood or other body fluids is medically disposed of (i.e. single use needles) or is sterilized using an autoclave. An autoclave is a device that sterilizes equipment using heat, steam, and pressure. An autoclave maintains a temperature of 250 degrees Fahrenheit under 10 pounds of pressure for 30 minutes or 270 degrees Fahrenheit under 15 pounds of pressure for 15 minutes. This is the only accepted method of sterilization to kill every living microorganism. Single needle use means one customer, one needle. The needles that are used on you are brand new, have been individually packaged, sealed, and autoclaved. After these needles are opened and used, they are disposed of in a safe medically appropriate manner. All ointments, gloves, razors, paper towels (used and unused), surface coverings, and any other materials used during your piercing process is disposed of immediately. Nothing is reused. Upon the disposal of these items all work surfaces are disinfected with an EPA approved veridical that kills any surface bacteria or viruses. All of this eliminates the possibility of contamination of materials. A note from the Association of Professional Piercers; “most ear piercing guns cannot be sterilized and anyone being pierced by them is a at risk.” For this reason most states have made it illegal to use these instruments to pierce any part of the body other than the ear lobe. Most importantly, “A reputable professional body piercer will not use a gun for any piercing – even for ear lobes.” A professional body piercing studio must be licensed which includes health department inspections. In addition, all professional body piercers must be licensed which includes passing a bloodborne pathogens exam. The studio and piercers’ licenses should be visible. If you don’t see them, ask for them. Professionals take pride in their skills and work environment.




How do I decide on which body piercer to work with?


Here are a few factors to consider when choosing a body piercer. Ensure the body piercer you are considering is licensed and practices proper sterilization and infection control standards. (see above, Is body piercing safe? for further explanation) Seeing a body piercer’s work on a client is one of the best ways to get a good idea of their work. The second best way is by looking at their portfolio. The Association of Professional Piercers suggests you review whether or not the piercings are placed to accent the anatomy or if they look awkward. Get a referral from someone you know that has a piercing you admire or inquire at your local health department. Most important, always trust your instincts. Do not base your decision on price. Remember, “You get what you pay for.” Ask questions o your body piercer; how long have they been piercing, what was the length of their apprenticeship, how they continue their education in the field. The APP reminds us that before taking your money a qualified professional body piercer will sit down with you, inspect your anatomy, discuss the procedure, potential risks, healing process, jewelry options, and aftercare guidelines. Again, trust your instincts, if at any point you feel something is wrong, leave.




Who can I contact with any questions or problems with my body piercing?


If you have any questions or problems, call us immediately a 305-534.7984. If it is after hours and you have a medical concern, please contact your doctor. If you are having a medical emergency, call 911.




Can I remove my body jewelry?


Do not remove the jewelry until your piercing is fully healed. Even then, the holes tend to close up quickly. If you need to remove your jewelry for a short time, for instance for a surgical procedure, please visit our studio so that we can put in a temporary retainer in for you.




Why does my new piercing have a red ridge around it?


You may see a small bump or ridge develop around your piercing that looks like a pimple. Do not pick at it! The bump may be a keloid and picking at it may make it bigger. A keloid is a smooth, hard, benign growth that forms when scar tissue grows excessively. Generally a keloid appears because of irritation. To reduce these you can put Vitamin E or aspirin on them, see a dermatologist and follow their medical recommendations, if optional, or reduce your jewelry gauge.




How do I know if my piercing is infected?


Always be certain to follow our piercing aftercare instructions, found on our Aftercare page. Just as with any infection, a sure sign is pus. If there is pus coming out of your piercing assess the situation immediately by following these recommendations. First and foremost do not use ointments such as Neosporin on the area. These block air from circulating. Second, do not remove the jewelry. The holes of your piercing may close around the infection potentially creating an abscess. If the pus is white your infection is minor and the use of a strong antiseptic for a few days should clear it right up. If the pus is yellow, your infection is more serious and a strong antiseptic does not clear it up in a few days please return to our studio so that we can take a look at it and help you. If the pus is green this indicates a very serious infection, you should come into our studio as soon as possible. If you are unable to come back to the studio please see a doctor.




What are some different types of body piercings?


Ear Piercings lobe, scaffold, tragus, conch, anti tragus, pinna, industrial, orbital, snug, rook, daith Lip Piercings labret, vertical labret, angel bites, Monroe, Medusa, snake bites, spider bites, cyber bites, dolphin bites, shark bites, canine bites, Dahlia bites Oral Piercings uvula, web, gum, venom, horizontal, smiley, frown Nose Piercings nostril, septum, bridge, nose tip, nasallang, high nostril Eyebrow Piercings vertical, horizontal, spiral, tear drop, crows feet, butterfly kiss, Navel Piercings upper vertical, lower vertical, vertical inverse, true navel, horizontal, multi navel Body Piercings nape, nipples, genitals




What are some different types of body jewelry?


straight barbell, curved barbell, d-ring, circular barbell, ball closure ring, segment ring, surface bar, nipple shield, labret stud, flesh tunnel, plug, taper/claw gauge, nose ring, nostril screw, l-shaped nose pin, nose bone/stud, captive ring, horseshoe




Where can I find information about body piercing aftercare?


You can find more information and detailed instructions about taking care of your new body piercing on our Aftercare page..





CONTACT US

© 2019 by Ken Cameron's South Beach Tattoo 

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now